7 Free Email Services with Unlimited Mailbox Storage

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Here we look at 7 Free Email Services with unlimited storage facility for your emails. Like every other email service, these email services provide support for mail attachments, IM services integration, virus scanners, etc. The only difference is that these email services don’t put restrictions on how many emails you can store. So if your profession requires exchanging gazillion emails, make sure that you check out this list! If you’re interested in free email clients to do your job, then you can check this list out.

Yandex Mail
Yandex Mail

Yandex mail is my favorite in this list of free email services with unlimited storage. This email service is truly a charm as it provides a truckload of features and almost no drawbacks. The best part is it provides these services with no ads! You might question if it has an unlimited mailbox storage as it offers a 10 GB storage when you start using it. Well, it keeps adding 1 GB extra to your storage whenever you reach the limit. This makes its mail storage capabilities virtually unlimited. Normally you can add attachments up to a size of 30 MB, but you can attach 2 GB big files using Yandex Disk. Don’t worry about the security, since it’s encrypted with SSL and TLS connections. The awesome features it has includes:

  • An Attractive and customizable user interface.
  • An integrated language translator.
  • Message templates.
  • Mail scheduling.

Some more small but helpful features include organizing labels, task lists, e-cards, accessibility options, etc. If you are having connection problems, then you can also change it to the light version, which uses basic HTML. Moreover, if you’re inactive, then it gives you 2 years before your account expires. I was honestly surprised since I didn’t expect all this from an ad-free email service.

Here is a full review.

Yahoo! Mail
YahooMail Front

Yahoo! Mail is a very well known and famous free email service provider. The storage provided by it is not truly unlimited, but it actually offers 1TB of free storage space. So, it is practically unlimited for most of the users, unless you get tons of spam every day (you can use this anti-spam service to avoid them). Yahoo! Mail is completely free and is supported by ads, unless you get Yahoo! Plus paid option to remove them. You can send email attachments with a limit of 25 MB and if you want to send larger files then you can do so using the Dropbox integration. With Dropbox, there is a limit of 150 MB per file and a total of 2 GB limit of all the attachments. It has the feature to use other email domains to send and receive emails and manage the emails of the same. It uses POP, IMAP and SMTP protocols to send and receive emails. Another awesome feature it flashes is that it has 200 mail filters for your emails. You can communicate fast with people with the help of Integrated Yahoo Messenger. It also keeps your system safe with Norton Antivirus and your mail safe with SSL encryption. I have used Yahoo! Mail for a lot of years before migrating to Gmail. The most bothersome problem was that of the spam. The filtering system wasn’t really doing its magic as the main inbox was always full of spam. However, things have been improving lately, with the addition of features like 1TB Storage, free POP3 access, and lot more.

Mail.Ru
Mail.Ru Front

Mail.Ru is a Russian free email service provided by the Mail.Ru group to cater the needs of Russian-speaking netizens. As usual in this list, Mail.Ru provides you with an unlimited storage to store all those emails. The site is supported by advertisements unless you decide to go premium by paying 5 dollars monthly. You can add a maximum of 25 MB attachment with the mail you are sending. The website works on basic POP, IMAP and SMTP mail protocols and the site is encrypted via SSL layer. The emails are also made safe with Kaspersky Antivirus. This email service also offers various other features such as filter rules, auto responder, mailbox integration from other email services, use your own domain, etc. A very awesome feature I found is that it gives free 25 GB cloud storage. This you can use to share files with people and acts as an alternative to mail attachments. You can also create and save documents, presentations, pdfs in the storage using Microsoft Office Online. My experience of Mail.Ru is a mixed one. Initially, I found it difficult to use since I couldn’t find the English interface, which I found some time later (the link above takes you there). Using the English interface, you can log in and you’ll find most of the services are translated in English. The ones that are not translated in English can be translated in the same using integrated translation tools in the browser. I loved using this mail service but the only problem is the language and I hope the developers develop this service to be more friendly for non-Russian speaking users.

Outlook.com
outlook front

Outlook.com is considered one of the most robust and potent email services. It is a free email service that offers practically unlimited storage. You can use its services for free, or pay to make it ad-free. It gives a powerful experience to its users as you can organize your emails, use Exchange Active sync, filter you emails from spam, scan viruses, set up alternate email aliases and what not. An awesome feature that Outlook.com offers is that it allows OneDrive integration, which allows you to send 5 GB large attachments. Security is well applied with SSL encryption. This is one email service worth trying out. Do note that even though the email storage is almost unlimited, but Microsoft has this page where it says that if your mailbox grows too fast, your emails may stop. There is no mention of what too fast means, or what is the limit. But for normal users, this should not be a problem. Apart from the virtually free unlimited storage, another thing I really like is the interface of Outlook.com. It is pretty bare bones and neat, so that I can focus on the mails at hand. In fact, I have even tried having Outlook.com like interface for Gmail for a while :)

GMX Mail
GMX front

GMX mail is an email service based in Germany. It stands for Global Mail eXchange. This email service provides a simple yet attractive form of visual interaction. GMX mail provides you with unlimited email storage and supports up to 50 MB large attachments. It is supported by advertisements. An awesome feature of this webmail service is that you can configure it to receive and manage emails from other webmail services. A catch in its service is that GMX users residing in Austria, Switzerland and Germany will be redirected to GMX.net, where only 1 GB of web storage is provided. Like every other reputed web email service, it provides spam filtering and anti-virus cover. However, a big drawback of this email service is that it is not encrypted. This means malicious hackers or programs can easily compromise the security of your emails, which is why I wouldn’t use it for sensitive work. It also doesn’t show embedded images nor can it organize your mail effectively.

Mail.com
mailpng

Mail.com is the American domain of the GMX mail service based in Europe. Normally I wouldn’t have added this one because it’s a twin of GMX mail. But, then again no twins are exactly the same. Mail.com has most of the features same as GMX (with most important being free unlimited email storage), but a lot of its features are paid. Like, you can’t use the basic IMAP, POP3, SMTP protocols without paying a fee. It is well secured with SSL encryption, unlike GMX.net. In GMX Mail, you can add about 50 MB big attachments like Mail.com. Mail.com provides 6 months more time than GMX mail before deactivation in case of inactivity. Mail.com has IM integration with Gtalk while GMX mail offers XMPP. You can’t customize your domain name with mail.com.

Rediffmail
redifffront

Rediffmail is an Indian email services provider. I wouldn’t call it a really awesome webmail service as it offers POP3 protocol only after payment. Though it offers an unlimited mailbox, but it also sends lots of spam from its parent site, which is really annoying. You can add attachments that shouldn’t cross 25 MB of size. Another downer is that it only allows 2 months of email account life during inactivity. It does not support IMAP or SMTP protocols. The only feature I found that might be exclusive to it is that it allows Tor browsing. Everything else is somewhat common to normal email services, minus the bigger points I mentioned earlier. I honestly wouldn’t recommend this service unless you are in urgent need of an unlimited mail storage, which can’t be fulfilled by one of the services mentioned above.

Conclusion

I tried all these mail services and I came to the conclusion that Yandex Mail is the winner of this list. Outlook.com comes second in the race. The one that made me cringe was Rediffmail, because of the drawbacks I mentioned. GMX mail is a good service, but the problem arises when you have to recover your password. GMX Mail doesn’t direct you to save your password but directs you to customer service, which is really annoying.

Mail.Ru was really rich in features, as it provided native cloud storage facility and integration to Microsoft Office Online. The only problem with Mail.Ru was the interface language that drags it down. The one that really grinds my gears was AOL Mail, which I haven’t added in the list. There was no way I could make an account at AOL Mail. The login page would tell me my username is okay, and when I would submit the form it warns me about the unavailability of the username. However, after it would somehow accept the username, the website would crash and show an error message. I tried using different systems and connections but still the problem persisted. So essentially, I wasn’t even able to try it out despite spending too many hours on it.

Do you feel a need for an email service with unlimited storage? Which email service do you use in that case? Let me know in comments below.

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